Having voted for Trump in 2016 and then making the unwise choice of accepting a blogger’s invitation to write an article on why — with a readership in an election district that went 89% for Hillary Clinton and just under 6% for Trump — I found myself quickly unpopular with friends, neighbors, and coworkers. Well, “unpopular” is not exactly accurate.

More like: “evil Nazi.”

Having moved to Texas in 2018 and last year briefly flirting with voting for someone other than Trump — now in an election district that was 78% Trump and 18% Hillary — I was staring at social death once again. Maybe not “Nazi,” but more like “LibTard.”

If I’m not mistaken, the Nazis put LibTards in concentration camps.

But I digress.

“How long can I keep this up?” I thought. I wonder if I will again be threatened by people who want to tar and feather me. (Because, you know, feathers are big in New York, and tar is big here.)

Here’s one truth we can all agree on: Trump has been polarizing like no other president. At least in my lifetime, maybe longer. Sure, Obama as the first black president raised eyebrows of those who hate black people. George W. Bush was reviled because people thought he “stole” the election. The GOP had it out for Clinton because he wouldn’t define the word “is” and because The Resolute desk was not the only wood in the Oval Office getting polished daily. A friend once told me that the numbers of letters in Ronald Wilson Reagan’s name made him the promised 666 beast.

Right. Beasts, blowjobs, and black people.

None of them caused the separation of oil and water as has Trump. Judged on that metric, Trump has done the country a disservice.

How many Facebook posts have you read where someone leads with, “I’ve been asking all my Trump supporter friends why they voted for him…” and they’ll detail how they never got a reasonable answer. Perhaps because their three Trump friends didn’t constitute a statistically valid sample?

“I reserve the right to be wrong.”

On the other side — and I fell into this trap at first — Trump supporters tell others to “just get over it” and yell into their opponents’ faces and raise fists… wait, did I suddenly describe other groups in the streets recently?

Anyway…

Here’s my rationale for voting for Trump in 2016. I wanted a president to keep my family from getting blown up by another 9/11 terrorist strike, and I wanted a president to create an economic environment that created jobs, especially for the poorest Americans.

Trump has accomplished both these things. My vote counted.

Why would I vote for him in 2020?

First, if his health worsens from COVID — as of this writing, he’s arguably getting better, but there are of course conflicting reports — I may well for a third-party candidate or write in someone. Biden will never get my vote at this point, because he’d likely die in office or become unable to govern, and I don’t want Kamala Harris running the country.

Here’s an interesting alternative:

Jo Jorgenson…

News center maine

Jo Jorgensen has some impressive credentials for leadership, including “a background in business and marketing, and a Ph.D. in industrial and organizational psychology.” This tells me she’s a do-er, but also a thinker. My guess is that she can unite rather than divide.

Her running mate, “Spike” Cohen, wants to give all Americans free cheesy bread and, frankly, I could get down with that.

For a different perspective, and a much funnier one than mine, check out my favorite YouTubers, The Hodge Twins:

Kevin and Keith Hodge are black Americans and Trump supporters. Yup. Those two are not mutually exclusive.

So why do black Americans support Trump? Why do gay black Americans support Trump? Why do former gang member black Americans support Trump?

Ask them, not me.

You might be surprised.

About Author

Husband, father, traveler, writer, surfer.

You might also enjoy:

2 Comments

  1. Just as a matter of interest, how has Trump created jobs for the poorest Americans? Hasn’t he just removed climate change regulations for big corporations and given tax breaks to his business buddies? I ask as someone not living in the US but interested in your fate as a country I’ve always loved.

    1. Obama did indeed lower unemployment, to his credit, and certaianly at a greater rate than Trump. (Of course, that’s natural due to the law of diminishing returns.) But just prior to COVID, non-farm unemployment — according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics — was at a 40-year low. Early in Trump’s presidency, the job growth for the poorest quintile was the fastest in years.

      I’m willing to be proved wrong, but the sharp criticism of Trump — because he is indeed a buffoon at best; a terrible person at worst — ignores things he has DONE to help America.

Leave A Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *